Date:December 5, 2020

A Bat Rescue Organization Posted Some Pics Of Bats Being Adorable To Raise More Awareness Of Their Importance To Our Ecosystem

Bats Qld (Flying Foxes & Microbats) Inc. is a volunteer-run, not-for-profit organization rescues, rehabilitates, and releases Flying Foxes and Microbats across South East Queensland (Gold Coast to Brisbane area), Australia. It also educates the young and old on the importance of Flying Foxes in our ecosystem along with dispelling the myths that have always surrounded these amazing mammals.

To do that, Bats Qld Inc. shares photos and videos of these mammals, and provides information regarding these cute sky puppies.

More info: batsqld.org.au | Facebook | Instagram

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BatsQld

Bats aren’t just pretty; they are important to our ecosystems. “Bats have meaningful roles in pollination and seed dispersal,” a spokesperson for Bats Qld reportedly said. “For example, the eucalyptus forest that the koalas rely on are pollinated by the flying foxes.” Also, these night flyers contribute to controlling insect populations.

Sadly, we often seem to forget these good deeds. “Humans are a threat to bats. Barbed wire, fruit netting, domestic pets, and car strikes are the most common reason they need help. The bigger picture would also include deforestation and habitat loss.”

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BatsQld

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BatsQld

These bad myths that surround these creatures serve them no good. We often hear that bats are dirty, but Bats Qld immediately rejects this notion: “Nope, bats are very clean animals and clean themselves all the time.”

Another misconception is that bats swoop people. “Nope again. Bats cannot fly like a bird but instead must drop before they can fly up, much like a paraglider. This is often mistaken for swooping.”

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BatsQld

You can also hear people say that bats have lots of diseases. “False, bats in Australia only carry one disease that poses a risk to people directly from the animal which is Australian Bat Lyssa Virus. This is found in less than 0.01% of the bat population.” Besides, there also is a fully effective post-exposure vaccine.

Interestingly, flying foxes have similar eyesight to ours, and although microbats don’t have the best vision, they can see as well.

The bottom line is that bats are doing their part in keeping the environment in check, and they deserve respect for their contribution.

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BatsQld

Bats are classified into two major groups: Flying Foxes and Microbats. Both share many similarities with humans: they have a similar skeletal structure (they have elongated fingers, not wings that they fly with), are warm-blooded, give birth and suckle their young, are devoted and caring mothers and even leave their children (called pups) at ‘childcare’ as they go in search of food!

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Flying Foxes play a key role in coastal forest ecology. Bats are the world’s only flying mammal and Flying Foxes are able to cross pollinate tall coastal forest trees. Almost all hardwood species need Flying Foxes for pollination. Hardwood flowers are only receptive to pollination at night, so the daytime activity of birds and bees does not fertilise the flowers. Flying Foxes fly much further than bees or most birds, so are able to cross-fertilise bushland over great distances each night. It has also been estimated that a single Flying Fox can disperse up to 3000 seeds a night. With increasing urbanisation, more man made hazards like barbed wire, power lines, domestic animals, cars and roads, and increasing heat events, Flying Fox numbers are declining at an alarming rate. Losing these wonderful animals will have catastrophic consequences to many other of our unique animals, especially tree-dwelling animals like koalas.

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Microbat (or insectivorous bat) can eat about a third of its own body weight in insects every night. In many parts of the world organic farmers install bat boxes throughout their farms as a natural form of pest control. Microbats are capable of catching up to 500 insects per hour, an average of one every seven seconds. Under controlled condition the Myotis bat (a small insectivorous bat that lives near waterways) has been recorded capturing 1200 tiny fruit flies in one hour. This is one every 3 seconds. Microbats are also voracious predators of mosquitoes. So why not consider putting up a bat box in your garden to keep the mozzies at bay?

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