Date:October 25, 2020

Daisugi — The Ancient Japanese Technique From The 14th Century Allows People To Produce Lumber Without Having To Cut Down Trees

Japan is an interesting country. Even though it’s a relatively small country in terms of landmass and population, it is known to be a hard-working and innovative nation with some amazing solutions to questions most people haven’t even thought of. One of them is the most famous Japanese exports to other parts of the world – Bonsai.

The art of growing tiny plants in pots that resemble big trees, dating back thousands of years. However, have you come across this technique called Daisugi? It follows quite a similar technique to that of Bonsai but the results are vastly different, reports Bored Panda. To put it in easily explainable terms, if Bonsai is Scott Lang as Ant-Man, Daisugi is GIANT Man. A twitter user by the name Wrath of Gnon explains the beautiful phenomenon through a series of tweets.

More info: Twitter, h/t [Bored Panda]

Apparently, there’s an ancient Japanese forestry technique called “daisugi”

Image credits: wrathofgnon Image credits: wrathofgnon

Send, ifunny

Originally invented by the people of the region of Kitayama, the method was used to solve the problem of shortage of seedlings. There is little flat land in the region, and planting and raising trees on the steep slopes proved extremely difficult. As a result, daisugi tailoring allowed arborists to reduce the number of plantations, make the harvest cycle faster, and produce denser wood as well.

Over the years, the popularity of such tree tailoring has declined. Today, these types of cedar mostly grow in well-kept gardens because of their slender and elegant appearance

Identical to the bonsai technique, this method developed back in the 14th century

Image credits: wrathofgnon Image credits: wrathofgnon Image credits: wrathofgnon

It is used on sugi—a Japanese cedar or Japanese redwood in English

Image credits: wrathofgnon Image credits: wrathofgnon

The technique helped to produce lumber that’s way more dense than that of a regular sugi

Image credits: wrathofgnon Image credits: wrathofgnon

The unique appearance of daisugi makes them appealing to have in ornamental gardens

Image credits: wrathofgnon Image credits: wrathofgnon

And there are still massive ancient daisugi around

Image credits: wrathofgnon

Image credits: wrathofgnon

Here’s how people responded to the Twitter thread

Image credits: wrathofgnon Image credits: wrathofgnon Image credits: 1000yearhouseImage credits: DHertzLocker

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